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Sunday, February 20, 2011

Redux Results

L-R from bottom to top: carbon trap shino(see below), dresang shino, redart shino, red malcolm, spotted malcolm, gold shino, orange shino, cherry blossom, copper salt, yellow salt, white salt, venetian,cranberry, peacock, buttery rust, biscayne, turquoise, fb shino, rutile blue, marks temmoku, gold temmoku, st johns black, marty fielding oribe, willy helix, spodumene, ohata khaki, cherry blossom with rutile, selsor base yellow, selsor base grey, vc matte yellow, charcoal matte, nutmeg with white satin matte.
I met with Barbara today to look at our results and gather some information. All in all, I think this was a very good firing for learning a lot about glaze chemistry. We had some good, some bad and some really bad, as would be expected for a test. But I think there is lots of potential here for more testing and for some good possibilities. Tiles 1, 2 and 3 left to right: carbon trap shino, dresang shino, redart shino. These were 3 of my favorites. Others I liked above 11, 12, 13 were copper salt, yellow salt and white salt, all of these were very stable and very consistant.
Dresang shino, I liked this shino the best
Ohata Khaki, no reduction, very blah. I have bowls that were glazed in Ohata and fired to ^10 that are beautiful so this is not good.
Red Malcolm shino, really crazy crawl, but great if you like that look, which I do. This was also put on way too thick, I was getting lazy on the sieving by this time.
The pieces that follow are Barbara's, I was going to wait until I got home and photo some of mine but my camera batteries died and there are none in the house. This is a yellow salt mug
Faux ash, all of these are on a dark brownstone clay body, this mug was great, one of my favorite things from the firing
The rest of the photos are carbon trap shino which I think was pretty successful. I'll get some more photos posted later and more info for you when I compile it......
I think this was a much more successful firing than the one I did at the workshop in Wilmington, although I am glad I had taken that workshop first because John Britt is a wealth of information and I understood what I was doing much better. Since it was just two of us and not a class room full, we were able to focus better, we studied recipes, and since I had already done a ^6 workshop we had a lot of information to go on. A lot of people in the workshop I took used the cherry blossom, but it shivered bad in this firing and most pieces had glaze flaking off, so I would not suggest that glaze, it's unstable on some clay bodies, test it first. It has potential to be a pretty glaze but it's fussy. We did test a lot with two selsor base recipes and added colorants, some good results there and some bad. I also have a nice turquoise piece and an amber celedon that I will get photos of tomorrow.
more to come, stay tuned......

20 comments:

John Bauman said...

Dang, love the yellow salt.

Tracey Broome said...

Yep John, the yellow salt is one of the best. Very stable, no issues at all, looks the same at ^6 as it does at 10 and it feels like satin to the touch. Only problem was a couple of cups had it on too thick and they were very glossy.

Linda Starr said...

Look at all the wonderful glazes, that mug is really sweet, I'm missing reduction now. Can't wait to see the rest.

Dennis Allen said...

I did a Malcom's w/redart but subbed Newman's for the redart.Very nice results.I'm with John on the Yellow Salt.Care to share?

Lori Buff said...

The yellow salt is one of my favorites also. I'd love to see the recipe too.
I've been playing with Nutmeg in White Satin in reduction and oxidation. Try putting it over lichen since you like the crawl.

Tracey Broome said...

hi all: Barbara has the recipes at her house but they are pretty common, most are in John Britt's book on high fire glazes. I will at some point try to post some of the better ones. I think if you google yellow salt you will find it, but I'll look it up...

Tracey Broome said...

Here's the yellow salt:
Yellow Salt Soda
Cone 10 (^6)reduction
Dolomite 20.15%
Nepheline syenite 60.46%
Zircopax 15.28%
Kentucky OM-4 Ball clay 4.11%
100.0%
Add:
Red iron oxide 0.96%
Bentonite 3.82%
Opaque light yellow glossy to matt.
Add approximately 1 or 2 tablespoons of Epsom salts dissolved in a little warm water to 5 gallons of glaze to help keep the glaze suspended.
Very nice on stoneware clays.
In reduction firing, with no salt or soda glaze, it makes a beautiful yellow matt with medium to slightly thin application.
Too thick and it gets shiny!
Too thin and it will be brown!

Trish said...

Wonderful collection and such great possibilities..I love the look of tidy test pieces all lined up.Good goin'!.

ang said...

stunning results broomester!!! of course the shino named after me is fab!! :))

andrea said...

have always love me a good shino.... luminous, luscious, lovable.

these are awesome.

mom2homer said...

Tracey, could you share the Cherry Blossom recipe? Ronan Petersen has published a revised CB4: http://ninetoespottery.blogspot.com/2010/10/cone-6-shino-firing.html

Jim said...

It looks like the Kaki was way too thin. I'd try it again and make it thicker. It's a pretty stable glaze, so it can go pretty thick.

Lori Buff said...

Thanks for the recipe.

Laura said...

what happened with that crackle slip? I've got mine firing up today. SWEET glazes. xo

Hollis Engley said...

You guys know how to do the glaze tests. Looks like a lot of good stuff. I'm with John and Dennis on the Yellow Salt. I've copied it from your comment and will mix a test for this week's firing. And fyi, we have finished the NC grits and have moved on to SC grits that came from a friend. We had a mix of the two as cheese grits this morning for breakfast. The two states seemed to get along just fine on the plate. Carolina lives on here on Cape Cod.

Michèle Hastings said...

wow... that's a lot of tests! my brain can't handle that many at once. being a shino lover i enjoyed seeing the different ones you tested.
i like using items like your little dishes for tests... when you are done with them you can sell them! even with a number on them. when i was getting ready to move i sold tons of little cups that were tests. they were a perfect size for toothpick holders, cotton swabs etc.

nick friedman said...

Those are awesome! So what changes have you done for lowering flux temperatures? Surely, those are not unmodified ^10 glazes. I'm dieing to know.

cookingwithgas said...

lovely test results TB you are rocking!

jimgottuso said...

wow, what a palette. totally dig # 12 and 27 and the malcolm crawly one too. makes me want to do big testing stint.

Tracey Broome said...

Jim #12 is the yellow salt, seems to be a favorite here, and #27 was a spodumene, regular ^10 glazes. Hi everyone else, I have tried to address your comments in the next post, email if I haven't answered you and Hollis you GO on those grits! Also, Jim, I don't think the Ohata was too thin, it just didn't do anything, none of the pretty colors you get at 10, it was just brown. Hope this helps, oh yeah Laura, nothing on that damn crackle!